Posts Tagged: mindfulness

time distortion


Do you know time distortion?

One time a moment takes for ever. Another time it seems as if time is not passing at all. You experience the same amount of time completely different then another time?

That can also happen in hypnosis. When a hypnotic subject is in a really deep hypnotic state and experiences some major internal shifts he might come back and either think he has been gone for only second when it was indeed 30 minutes or he might have experienced it as hours when it where only very few minutes.

Something similar can happen when you are very much concentrated and focused on something you do. You might drive home in the evening and can’t even recall how you got there. Or you are waiting for that airplane to finally arrive and you are so concentrated on that, that it takes for ever.

Which is, I think quiet logical, if you regard hypnosis as a very ultra high concentration state. I often use this example to show that Hypnosis it not at all anything special, or even magic whoowhoo (although it might feel like that). A hypnotic state is something very usual and common to being human.

I would even suggest that you spend your time doing stuff, where you forget about time at all. Imagine spending your day with a project where you even forgot to look at you watch and you only notice when you are done. You might come close to happiness.

one family?

Imagine somebody could tell you where you´re actually from. A journey around the world and it all sums up to be you.

This is a commercial, but well, what would happen, if you´d find out all, the people you hate most are actually your ancestors?

End the end, we are one family. Amazing:

relations matter most

This TED talk really is worth being watched. It’s about a 75 year long happiness study which comes to one conclusion: The quality of relationships is what matters most in life.

Those who were the most satisfied with their relationships in their 50s were the healthiest in their 80s. Just watch yourself:

over

without words:

more than honey

Honey and bees are such a nice metaphor. Bees dedicate their whole life to the best for the community. Bees in the summer collect nectar for honey, so their successors in the wintertime won’t starve. Only if every part of the bee community fulfills its own mission the hive can survive and thrive.

As it is such a fragile system the bees live in and it is similar in the world where they find their food. In their direct surrounding they need to find flowers that produce nectar and pollen. If it is too cold, the bees can’t fly, if it is too rainy flowers might not open and the bees can’t fly. If it becomes to hot the flowers may wither. Even in an all natural world it seems as a wonder that bees survive throughout the years.

As it happened to be I started to keep bees on myself in 2003. It fascinated me from the first moment I opened a beehive. What I had to learn while keeping bees is that nowadays life became even harder for bees. When you have the possibility to look into such a fragile structure as a bee hive, you have a direct mirror for what is going on around you.

Farmers are growing only one crop so bees starve once this crop has no more flowers. Since every part of the countryside was turned into farmland. Crops are heavily treated with pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides. No other plant than the desired crops are growing anymore.

Furthermore the applied chemicals can be found in wax and honey. If you are truly concerned about collecting a clean and precious bee products you have to worry about nature as well. On top of these problems, scientists imported a bee mite from Asia in the last century. This mite is decimating bees around the globe and industrial beekeepers started to implement chemical pharma products until the mites became resistant 10 years ago.

This shows me that it might not be healthy to engineer and to try to improve nature. Concerning the bees it might be the best, to reduce stress for them as much as possible and give them time to adapt to the mites, which means less honey for us. Bees in Asia are coping with it as well. The more we give our bees the right to reproduce as they like the more we might give them the chance to survive. I try to leave as much honey as possible to my bees and let them on their own for most of the year. That reduces the amount of honey I can collect per year but I believe this adds up to its superior quality.

These principles might apply to nature in general as much as for dealing with people especially our kids as well.

  • Don’t optimize all the time.
  • Give them space.
  • Give them the right to be imperfect.
  • Give them the freedom to learn.

Control is just an illusion!